Seek These Things

a blog discussing Celiac Disease, & the Gluten Free Diet, Books, Parenting, Politics, Religion, Pets, Product Reviews, and whatever else catches my interest

Second Generation Celiac Risk February 7, 2009

My husband C. was diagnosed with Celiac Disease when I was 3 months pregnant. Because the disposition for this illness runs in families, we wanted to do everything we could to keep our new baby healthy.

We learned 1 in 3 girls with a parent with CD is likely to develop the disease. Boys have a lower risk, for reasons unexplained in our research, only a 1 in 8 chance. ***

At-risk infants are 5 times more likely to develop CD if they are exposed to gluten before the first 4-6 months of life; however, if a child is not exposed to gluten before the end of 6 months of life, their risk increases again. (Danna Korn, Gluten Free for Dummies,  p.55, (2006))

A woman without CD does not need to follow a Gluten Free Diet during gestation to protect her fetus. Women with CD who do not follow a gluten free diet have a higher rate of infertility, miscarriage, and birth defects. (Danna Korn, Kids with Celiac Disease: A Family guide to raising Happy, Healty Gluten Free Kids, p. 156, (2001))

Mothers nursing an at-risk infant should follow the Gluten Free Diet. My pediatrician explained if a nursing mother is accidentally exposed to a small amount gluten, it should not pose a risk to a nursing infant. Gluten, the protein found in wheat, rye, and barley, is coated before it is excreted in the breast milk. This coating should protect the nursing infant. Also, gluten is a large protein that normally cannot get from the intestine to the blood stream. A protein called zonulin, found in higher levels in people with CD, binds to key receptors in the intestine and opens the passage extra wide for the gluten to get through. (Danna Korn, Kids with Celiac Disease: A Family guide to raising Happy, Healthy Gluten Free Kids, p. 157, (2001))

If your baby eats formula, exclusively or in addition to breast milk, at this time both the Similac and Enfamil formulas are gluten-free. The Walmart brand formula is not GF. If you have questions, always call the number on the packaging from your cell phone.

Better education leads to a better life. Good luck raising your at-risk child.

*** I still have not been able to find the exact reference to this statistic yet. Here is what I have found:

  • If one of your children has Celiac Disease, the likelihood of another child having it is 30%. (Danna Korn, Kids with Celiac Disease: A Family guide to raising Happy, Healthy Gluten Free Kids, p. 143, (2001))
  • Up to 30% of people with the genes for CD, do not have CD; the other 70% do, whether they are diagnosed or not. (Danna Korn, Kids with Celiac Disease: A Family guide to raising Happy, Healthy Gluten Free Kids, p. 148, (2001))
  • Up to 30% of first degree relatives (parent, sibling, child) of a person with CD have CD. Although they may be asymptomatic, the damage is still being done. It is very common that they will resist if not flat out refuse to be tested. (Danna Korn, Kids with Celiac Disease: A Family guide to raising Happy, Healthy Gluten Free Kids, p. 152, (2001))
  • CD affects females about 3 times more often than males. ((Danna Korn, Kids with Celiac Disease: A Family guide to raising Happy, Healthy Gluten Free Kids, p. 7, (2001))
 

Celiac and Diabetes October 28, 2008

Filed under: the Gluten Free Diet — seekthesethings @ 2:34 am
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After my husband was diagnosed with Celiac, we made our whole house a gluten free oasis. We sorted thru every every box and bottle in our cupboards, medicine cabinet, pantry, and food storage. We gave away boxes of food to our family, friends, and neighbors. I wanted C. to have piece of mind knowing that everything in our house was safe and would not make him sick.

A few months later I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes. We became expert at GF diabetic breakfasts (eggs, eggs, and more eggs!). Since then I have sought to become more aware of connections between celiac and diabetes. For example:

Did you know that children with Type 1 diabetes are more likely to need the Gluten Free diet than children thier age in the general population? Danish researchers have found that around 1 in 8 children with Type 1 diabetes also have celiac disease, these doctors conclude that regular screening for celiac disease should be conducted in all children with type 1 diabetes. (Source)

While no connection has been found between Type II Diabetes and Celiac Disease (source), Celiac’s can develop type II diabetes. One step you can take to lower your risk is to focus on eating a healthy GF diet. Did you know that 1/3 cup of white rice has 15 grams of carbs? Celiac’s with diabetes must limit their carb intake by eating fewer gf grains, fruits, and high-carb vegetables, and eating more lean protien and low carb veggies.

Did you know rice naturally has more sugar than whole wheat? To lower the amount of natural sugar in your GF Recipe’s, you can substitute brown rice flour for white rice flour.

If you have Celiac Disease and diabetes, a family history of diabetes, or other risk factors, please talk to your doctor about managing your blood sugar on the Gluten Free Diet.